Ireland's mighty waves are not tough for everyone

Ireland travel guide

ⓘ Tourism in Ireland

Tourism in the Republic of Ireland is one of the most important sectors of the economy, as the country is visited by more than 6. million tourists annually, which is about 1. times more than Ireland's own population. Ireland's tourism industry employs over 200,000 people and has annual tourism revenue of around € 5 billion DiscoverIreland. om has been named the best travel site in the world. Most of the tourists visiting Ireland come from the UK, USA, Germany and France.

Transport links with Ireland

The main flow of tourists arrives in Ireland by air. Ireland's national carrier is Aer Lingus, which serves destinations in Europe, North America and North Africa, but the vast majority of flights from continental Europe are operated by another Irish airline, the low-cost airline Ryanair. Ireland has three major international airports - Shannon, Dublin Airport and Cork Airport. Dublin Airport is by far the busiest airport, accounting for over 80% of passenger traffic to/from Ireland in 2011. Along with the three largest international airports, there are airports in the cities of Knock and Kerry, which serve flights to Europe.

Tourists from mainland Europe and the UK can also enter Ireland by sea, ferries from Roscoff and Cherbourg in France, Liverpool, Pembroke Dock, Fishgard and Holyhead in the UK and Douglas on the Isle of Man. These routes are operated by Irish Ferries, Stena Line, Celtic Link Ferries and P&O Ferries.

The road network in Ireland is well developed and currently has a length of 1,017 kilometers. Highways connect Dublin with all major cities in the country, and there are plans to expand this highway system. In recent years, the quality of Irish roads has improved significantly thanks to the country's economic growth, as well as funding from the European Union, although outside the main routes, roads can look completely unpredictable in terms of quality and maintenance, especially in rural areas such as County Kerry and Donegal.

The railway network in Ireland was most developed in the 1920s, at which time the length of the Irish railways was 5,600 km 3,400 miles, only about a third of this length has survived to our time. As of early 2014, Ireland has only one light rail system, the Luas in Dublin, which opened in 2004. Luas carried 27 million passengers in 2010, making it the biggest success in Dublin's public transport history, Irish Transport Minister Leo Varadkar said.

Dublin Attractions

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Due to its territorial proximity to Great Britain, Dublin was the most important city in Ireland during the British Raj until 1922, when the Irish Free State was created. Dublin Airport is located in the immediate vicinity of the city, so most foreign tourists start their acquaintance with Ireland from here. Among the main attractions of the city are Dublin Castle, the residence of the British authorities in Ireland until 1922, Phoenix Park - one of the largest city parks in the world, Dublin General Post Office - one of the most famous historical buildings in Ireland in connection with the Easter Rising of 1916, the former Kilmanham prison, converted to the museum, as well as Trinity College, which houses the Book of Kells and the Book of Darrow. In 2010, Dublin was named City of Literature by UNESCO to commemorate the city as the birthplace of many famous writers such as James Joyce and Samuel Beckett.

Other Dublin Attractions:

  • Temple Bar, a square in the southern part of the city, with many narrow medieval streets, famous for its pubs and nightclubs;
  • Bloomsday, a festival in honor of James Joyce, author of Ulysses, set in Dublin. Held annually on June 16 - the day the novel is set;
  • Guinness Brewery, founded in 1759, where the famous Guinness beer is brewed;
  • Halpenny Bridge, bridge over the River Liffey; <
  • St Stephens Green, a public park in the city center.
  • Croke Park, one of the largest stadiums in Europe and the main stadium of the Gaelic Athletic Association;

Encyclopedia | Ireland Tourism - Wiki

ⓘ Tourism in Ireland

Tourism in the Republic of Ireland is one of the most important sectors of the economy, as the country is visited by more than 6. million tourists annually, which is about 1. times more than Ireland's own population. Ireland's tourism industry employs over 200,000 people and has annual tourism revenue of around € 5 billion DiscoverIreland. om has been named the best travel site in the world. Most of the tourists visiting Ireland come from the UK, USA, Germany and France.

Transport links with Ireland

The main flow of tourists arrives in Ireland by air. Ireland's national carrier is Aer Lingus, which serves destinations in Europe, North America and North Africa, but the vast majority of flights from continental Europe are operated by another Irish airline, the low-cost airline Ryanair. Ireland has three major international airports - Shannon, Dublin Airport and Cork Airport. Dublin Airport is by far the busiest airport, accounting for over 80% of passenger traffic to/from Ireland in 2011. Along with the three largest international airports, there are airports in the cities of Knock and Kerry, which serve flights to Europe.

Tourists from mainland Europe and the UK can also enter Ireland by sea, ferries from Roscoff and Cherbourg in France, Liverpool, Pembroke Dock, Fishgard and Holyhead in the UK and Douglas on the Isle of Man. These routes are operated by Irish Ferries, Stena Line, Celtic Link Ferries and P&O Ferries.

The road network in Ireland is well developed and currently has a length of 1,017 kilometers. Highways connect Dublin with all major cities in the country, and there are plans to expand this highway system. In recent years, the quality of Irish roads has improved significantly thanks to the country's economic growth, as well as funding from the European Union, although outside the main routes, roads can look completely unpredictable in terms of quality and maintenance, especially in rural areas such as County Kerry and Donegal.

The railway network in Ireland was most developed in the 1920s, at which time the length of the Irish railways was 5,600 km 3,400 miles, only about a third of this length has survived to our time. As of early 2014, Ireland has only one light rail system, the Luas in Dublin, which opened in 2004. Luas carried 27 million passengers in 2010, making it the biggest success in Dublin's public transport history, Irish Transport Minister Leo Varadkar said.

Dublin Attractions

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Due to its territorial proximity to Great Britain, Dublin was the most important city in Ireland during the British Raj until 1922, when the Irish Free State was created. Dublin Airport is located in the immediate vicinity of the city, so most foreign tourists start their acquaintance with Ireland from here. Among the main attractions of the city are Dublin Castle, the residence of the British authorities in Ireland until 1922, Phoenix Park - one of the largest city parks in the world, Dublin General Post Office - one of the most famous historical buildings in Ireland in connection with the Easter Rising of 1916, the former Kilmanham prison, converted to the museum, as well as Trinity College, which houses the Book of Kells and the Book of Darrow. In 2010, Dublin was named City of Literature by UNESCO to commemorate the city as the birthplace of many famous writers such as James Joyce and Samuel Beckett.

Other Dublin Attractions:

  • Temple Bar, a square in the southern part of the city, with many narrow medieval streets, famous for its pubs and nightclubs;
  • Bloomsday, a festival in honor of James Joyce, author of Ulysses, set in Dublin. Held annually on June 16 - the day the novel is set;
  • Guinness Brewery, founded in 1759, where the famous Guinness beer is brewed;
  • Halpenny Bridge, bridge over the River Liffey; <
  • St Stephens Green, a public park in the city center.
  • Croke Park, one of the largest stadiums in Europe and the main stadium of the Gaelic Athletic Association;

Thrill-seekers can take part in the Dublin Ghosts Night Tour.

Ireland, which occupies most of the island of the same name, is exposed to strong waves of the Atlantic, drawn by the powerful Gulf Stream. The peculiarity of the harsh nature, world-class surf spots, established infrastructure, good transport accessibility have made surfing in Ireland popular for local and traveling athletes.

The island is 450x300 km in size and has a long coastline. Of interest to surfers are the southern and especially the western coasts, dotted with numerous bays, fjords, riverbeds.

I'll tell you more about these places for surfing and recreation in Ireland:

  • County Donegal and the surfing capital of Bundoran
  • Spots in Sligo County
  • Strandhill
  • County Waterford
  • Claims
  • Inch - Clare County
  • Ballybunion - Kerry County

Endless wide beaches alternate with formidable cliffs, heathery hills and thick soft grass. Stones and flat bizarre reefs are hidden in the water, giving rise to interesting waves.

Climate

The Gulf Stream around the west coast brings warmth and moisture here, so the weather can be unpredictable.

  • During the day, you can feel the change of all seasons here.
  • With some stretch, the local weather can be considered autumnal all year round, because the summer here is cool, the winter is frost-free.
  • In January, surfing conditions are tough: average temperature +5, stormy wind from the North Atlantic, bad weather, water about +7 degrees.
  • The most favorable weather is from July to August, when the average temperature is +17, but with intense sun, the water warms up to +15, and the waves are not higher than five meters.
  • In September, the season of high waves begins, reaching a peak in January.
  • In Donegal, the roaring ocean sometimes throws waves up to 23 meters onto the shore.

There are even warmer places. For example, in Santander, Spain.

Due to the cool climate in Ireland, surfers wear full wetsuits at least 3mm thick, as well as hoods, gloves and water shoes. The raincoat and umbrella are the permanent daily attributes of the Irish people. Rain, gray skies, coastal winds that sometimes reach brutal speeds - how to surf in this weather? But for the sake of trying out the Irish waves, you should postpone your trip to the tropics: the local sensations are strong and unique! Let's get acquainted with Irish spots, starting from the north

Peculiarities of holidays in Ireland

Excellent Ireland, the capital of which is one of the world's oldest cities - Dublin, is located on the island of the same name in the Atlantic Ocean, occupying most of it. In addition, this is one of the most beautiful places on the planet, called the Green Island, so the country definitely deserves a visit. But this is not the only plus of staying in Ireland, since the local flavor and excellent taste of the local beer also deserve a special mention. Mysterious burials, Celtic features, medieval castles and ancient ruins of settlements are all here.

The maritime climate of the country accompanies travel, since the north-western and western coasts are washed by a rather warm current of the Gulf Stream. Winter is very mild here, without severe frosts, and summer is very warm and comfortable. Therefore, most tourists come here precisely in the summer season, when nature pleases visitors with warmth, and everything around is colorful and beautiful, namely, from early July to mid-September.

But there are some features of nature that are worth considering. The temperature regime here often changes, and the weather is quite capricious. Precipitation falls here in the form of rain, and most of it falls on the western part of the island.

Car Rental Ireland

Renting a car in Ireland is not so difficult. The main thing is to observe a few rules, which will be discussed below:

The first is at least 21 years of age. This is a typical requirement, but it can change upward, depending on the type of car, and some companies generally put forward a requirement for the age of at least 25 years, but this is more the exception than the rule.

Second, these are rights with an issue date of more than 2 years. Even if you have more experience, and your rights have changed recently, no one will understand this.

The third condition is solvency. They may be asked to disclose the amount of funds in the current account in order to understand your creditworthiness.

And fourth, this is the internal and moral readiness to drive around the island where there is left-hand traffic. Believe me, it is not so easy. In the first days, cold sweat can be poured over more than once, and not twice.

The rental price differs greatly from the type of car. If this is a small car like Toyota Aygo (we know it better as Yaris), then the price will start from 14-17 euros per day, and cars of a higher class can reach 80-110 euros per day of use. But there is no particular sense in renting such cars. Gasoline also costs money and why spend more.

Before the keys are handed over to you, they will definitely conclude an agreement with you, they can take a deposit for the keys (I don’t really understand why?), conclude an insurance contract and preliminarily discuss the terms and place of delivery of the car, since the networks of companies operating in this market are scattered. read in full

Tourism in the Republic of Ireland is one of the important sectors of the economy, as the country is visited by more than 6.2 million tourists annually, which is about 1.4 times more than Ireland's own population [1]. Ireland's tourism industry employs over 200,000 people and has annual tourism revenue of around € 5 billion [2] [3]. In 2011, Lonely Planet readers voted Ireland “the best vacation destination in the world”, Cork as one of the top ten cities in the world, and Irish website DiscoverIreland. om has been named the best travel site in the world [4] [5]. Most of the tourists visiting Ireland come from the UK, USA, Germany and France.

Contents

Transport links with Ireland [edit]

The main flow of tourists arrives in Ireland by air. Ireland's national carrier is Aer Lingus, which serves destinations in Europe, North America and North Africa, but the vast majority of flights from continental Europe are operated by another Irish airline, the low-cost airline Ryanair. Ireland has three major international airports - Shannon, Dublin Airport and Cork Airport. Dublin Airport is by far the busiest airport, accounting for more than 80% of passenger traffic to/from Ireland in 2011 [6]. Along with the three largest international airports, there are airports in the cities of Knock and Kerry, which serve flights to Europe.

Tourists from mainland Europe and the UK can also enter Ireland by sea, ferries from Roscoff and Cherbourg in France, Liverpool, Pembroke Dock, Fishgard and Holyhead in the UK and Douglas on the Isle of Man. These routes are operated by Irish Ferries, Stena Line, Celtic Link Ferries and P&O Ferries [7] [8] [9].

Road network in Ireland (English) Russian. well developed and currently has a length of 1017 kilometers. Highways connect Dublin with all major cities in the country, and there are plans to expand this highway system. In recent years, the quality of Irish roads has improved significantly thanks to the country's economic growth, as well as funding from the European Union, although outside the main routes, roads can look completely unpredictable in terms of quality and maintenance, especially in rural areas such as County Kerry and Donegal.

The railway network in Ireland was most developed in the 1920s, at which time the length of the Irish railways was 5,600 km (3,400 miles), only about a third of this length has survived to our time. As of early 2014, Ireland has only one light rail system, Luas. in Dublin, opened in 2004. Luas carried 27.5 million passengers in 2010, which is why Irish Transport Minister Leo Varadkar. noted that this is the largest success in the history of public transport in Dublin [10].

Attractions [edit]

Cities [edit]

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. Due to its territorial proximity to Great Britain, Dublin was the most important city in Ireland during the British Raj (until 1922, when the Irish Free State was created). Dublin Airport is located in the immediate vicinity of the city, so most foreign tourists start their acquaintance with Ireland from here. Among the main attractions of the city are Dublin Castle (the seat of the British authorities in Ireland until 1922), Phoenix Park - one of the largest city parks in the world [11], Dublin General Post Office - one of the most famous historical buildings in Ireland in connection with the Easter Rising of 1916, the former Kilmanham prison converted into a museum; and Trinity College, which houses the Book of Kells and the Book of Darrow. [12] In 2010, Dublin was awarded the title of City of Literature by UNESCO to commemorate the city's home to many famous writers such as James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. [13]

Other Dublin Attractions:

  • Guinness Brewery , founded in 1759, where the famous Guinness beer is brewed;
  • Bloomsday, a festival in honor of James Joyce, author of the novel "Ulysses", which takes place in Dublin. Held annually on June 16 - the day the novel is set [14];
  • Halfpenny Bridge, bridge over the River Liffey;
  • Croke Park, one of the largest stadiums in Europe and the main stadium of Gaelic Athletic Association [15];
  • Temple Bar, a square in the southern part of the city, with many narrow medieval streets, famous for its pubs and nightclubs;
  • St. Stephens Green, public park in the city center.

Thrill-seekers can take part in the Dublin Ghosts Night Tour.

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