First aid kit for a hike composition

List of travel first aid kit

In continuation of the article about the home first-aid kit - I tell you about my individual first-aid kits, that is, the lists of medicines and medicines that I carry with me outside the house under certain conditions. Note that all first-aid kits are different, and each completes them for himself. Here are my examples ...

Wearable Personal First Aid Kits

My version of a travel or car first aid kit.

Case with many pockets from Tatanka. The large compartment contains:

  • 1 sterile and 3 non-sterile bandages;
  • 1 elastic bandage;
  • surgical suture material with atraumatic needles (Catgut and Vicril);
  • sachets of Cellox;
  • Bactroban's foferrik (topical antibiotic);
  • Mosquito clamp;
  • blunt scissors;
  • alcohol, peroxide, chlorhexidine and betadine.

Nearby in the adjacent branch:

  • Novocaine, saline and syringes 10.0;
  • Katejel;
  • sterile gloves.

This ends the surgical part and begins the therapeutic one:

  • Smecta in sachets;
  • Regidron;
  • Nurofen and other analgesics;
  • antibiotics;
  • antispasmodics;
  • eye drops;
  • tourniquet and adhesive plaster.

The first aid kit has helped me out more than once in difficult situations. Offer your own options for completing such first-aid kits. Everything that you say useful - I will take note of it.

My version of a wearable daily first aid kit. I used to carry the SAT tourniquet with me. Then I changed it to a more compact and convenient one. Now I've given it up altogether. And not only from him. Laid out a Soviet-style IPP from my pocket. But this does not mean that I have given up the first aid kit altogether. Just upgraded the daily wearable kit.

  • Sterile wide bandage;
  • Cellox (small and large sachet);
  • elastic bandage;
  • sanitary kerchief;
  • sterile gloves with quick dressing system.

This whole set is much lighter and less than what I wore before (tourniquet, API, gloves, scarf).

DIY tourist first aid kit - a list of necessary medicines

It doesn't matter how often you go camping - once a year, or you can't imagine your life without going out to nature at all and do it regularly, you should make sure you have a first aid kit. In this article, you will learn how to properly assemble a first-aid kit for a hike and what medications you need to complete it.

We would like to draw your attention to the fact that the medications in question act on each organism individually, therefore, before using this or that drug, you should definitely consult with a specialist. Some medications have contraindications and side effects, so be careful and careful.

So, you are going on a hike. What should your first aid kit look like? Let's proceed to its configuration. We will divide all medications into groups and comment on their appointment.

Antibiotics

There is a lot of controversy about the need for antibiotics in a first aid kit - are they really needed? Many experienced tourists and survivalists answer this question in the following way - they will not be superfluous. But if you figure it out and approach this topic more seriously, then the usefulness of having antibiotics on a hike is practically reduced to zero.

Firstly, almost all types of this drug require a long course of treatment, and if antibiotics are in ampoules and they need to be injected intramuscularly, then doing this in a hike will be quite problematic. Not everyone has the experience to give injections, and you shouldn't forget about unsanitary conditions. secondly, the likelihood that you will get a disease requiring the intervention of antibiotics is extremely small, because you go to nature initially healthy, it is another matter that if you have already had a cold, and then caught pneumonia, or you have exacerbated chronic bronchitis. It usually takes no more than 5 days to go on a hike, so it is better to continue treatment with antibiotics upon returning home under the supervision of specialists.

Despite the above, it is still worth putting an antibiotic in your first aid kit. Our recommendation is Sumamed (azithromycin), it has a wide range of uses and is applied once a day and comes in tablets. It is also noteworthy that the course of treatment is only 3 days, which is ideal for hiking.

Further - Tsifran (in tablets) is a drug with a very large spectrum of action, suitable for the treatment of lung diseases and various infections. Flemoxin Solutab (Amoxicillin) is an antibiotic from the penicillin group, a very effective drug, suitable for the treatment of many diseases - tonsillitis, otitis media, various other infections.

Analgesics

Perhaps, analgesics can be attributed to one of the most essential groups of medicines in a first aid kit. These are drugs that have an analgesic effect, and the risk of experiencing pain during a hike is very high. We recommend that you complete your first aid kit with the most proven means:

The nearest settlement is far away, the mobile network does not catch - what to do in such a situation? It's good if the group includes a hiking doctor or someone with a medical degree, and if not? In this case, to provide the necessary assistance to the victim, and a field first aid kit will help to wait for qualified assistance. Therefore, going on a long (or not so) journey, you need to competently assemble a first-aid kit or purchase a ready-made complete version. In the article you will find answers to the questions: what should be in a first-aid kit for a tourist and how to determine the required amount of content?

First aid kit selection

A tourist's first-aid kit can be bought in a ready-made version, which contains all the necessary and non-harmful medicines and materials, with detailed instructions. However, you still have to deal with the content. It is possible that there will be a need to supplement the content depending on the number and composition of the tourist group. You may also find useful material on the order of registration of tourist groups.

If you decide to assemble a first aid kit with your own hands, then consider the following rules:

The specific contents of the first aid kit will also depend on the type and category of the trip (water, mountain, forest, extreme), duration, age of participants, season

In the case where the group includes a person who has a permit (certificate) to inject, it is possible to include ampoules for injections and syringes of various sizes in the contents.

Packaging requirements

In addition to the composition, the packaging itself plays an important role. Medicines need to be stored under specific conditions. They should not be exposed to sunlight, moisture, and they do not tolerate high temperatures well. Compliance with storage conditions is especially important for ampoules with solutions for injection. On a hike, an inadequate first aid kit may become unusable and the materials it contains will become ineffective.

A first aid kit must have packaging that meets all of the following requirements:

  • Tightness. Even if you drop the first aid kit in water, not a single drop should get inside.
  • Stiffness. The packaging should not deform when carried in a backpack, shaken, or bumped. Many plastic containers meet this requirement.
  • The strength of the lock. Under all conditions, it should be easy to open and simply snap into place. Pay attention to the connection of the lid to the box.
  • Availability of cushioning tabs. They will protect glass and plastic packaging of medicines from damage if dropped from a height.
  • Light weight. Better to give preference to lightweight packaging.
  • All medications must be labeled with the name and expiration date
  • For the convenience of manual carrying, the first aid kit can be equipped with a handle or strap.
  • Large, bright markings in a conspicuous place denoting their purpose.

DIY tourist first aid kit - a list of necessary medicines

It doesn't matter how often you go camping - once a year, or you can't imagine your life without going out to nature at all and do it regularly, you should make sure you have a first aid kit. In this article, you will learn how to properly assemble a first-aid kit for a hike and what medications you need to complete it.

We would like to draw your attention to the fact that the medications in question act on each organism individually, therefore, before using this or that drug, you should definitely consult with a specialist. Some medications have contraindications and side effects, so be careful and careful.

So, you are going on a hike. What should your first aid kit look like? Let's proceed to its configuration. We will divide all medications into groups and comment on their appointment.

Antibiotics

There is a lot of controversy about the need for antibiotics in a first aid kit - are they really needed? Many experienced tourists and survivalists answer this question in the following way - they will not be superfluous. But if you figure it out and approach this topic more seriously, then the usefulness of having antibiotics on a hike is practically reduced to zero.

Firstly, almost all types of this drug require a long course of treatment, and if antibiotics are in ampoules and they need to be injected intramuscularly, then doing this in a hike will be quite problematic. Not everyone has the experience to give injections, and you shouldn't forget about unsanitary conditions. secondly, the likelihood that you will get a disease requiring the intervention of antibiotics is extremely small, because you go to nature initially healthy, it is another matter that if you have already had a cold, and then caught pneumonia, or you have exacerbated chronic bronchitis. It usually takes no more than 5 days to go on a hike, so it is better to continue treatment with antibiotics upon returning home under the supervision of specialists.

Despite the above, it is still worth putting an antibiotic in your first aid kit. Our recommendation is Sumamed (azithromycin), it has a wide range of uses and is applied once a day and comes in tablets. It is also noteworthy that the course of treatment is only 3 days, which is ideal for hiking.

Further - Tsifran (in tablets) is a drug with a very large spectrum of action, suitable for the treatment of lung diseases and various infections. Flemoxin Solutab (Amoxicillin) is an antibiotic from the penicillin group, a very effective drug, suitable for the treatment of many diseases - tonsillitis, otitis media, various other infections.

Analgesics

Perhaps, analgesics can be attributed to one of the most essential groups of medicines in a first aid kit. These are drugs that have an analgesic effect, and the risk of experiencing pain during a hike is very high. We recommend that you complete your first aid kit with the most proven means:

Analgin. This is one of the cheapest pain relievers available. Blocks pain only of low and medium intensity, can be useful for relieving mild headaches or toothaches, but not suitable for severe cases. Another disadvantage is that there are many contraindications and side effects. aralgin. Quite quickly relieves even very severe pain, much more effective than analgin, but it is also more expensive. There are also various contraindications.

DIY tourist first aid kit - a list of necessary medicines

It doesn't matter how often you go camping - once a year, or you can't imagine your life without going out to nature at all and do it regularly, you should make sure you have a first aid kit. In this article, you will learn how to properly assemble a first-aid kit for a hike and what medications you need to complete it.

We would like to draw your attention to the fact that the medications in question act on each organism individually, therefore, before using this or that drug, you should definitely consult with a specialist. Some medications have contraindications and side effects, so be careful and careful.

So, you are going on a hike. What should your first aid kit look like? Let's proceed to its configuration. We will divide all medications into groups and comment on their appointment.

Antibiotics

There is a lot of controversy about the need for antibiotics in a first aid kit - are they really needed? Many experienced tourists and survivalists answer this question in the following way - they will not be superfluous. But if you figure it out and approach this topic more seriously, then the usefulness of having antibiotics on a hike is practically reduced to zero.

Firstly, almost all types of this drug require a long course of treatment, and if antibiotics are in ampoules and they need to be injected intramuscularly, then doing this in a hike will be quite problematic. Not everyone has the experience to give injections, and you shouldn't forget about unsanitary conditions. secondly, the likelihood that you will get a disease requiring the intervention of antibiotics is extremely small, because you go to nature initially healthy, it is another matter that if you have already had a cold, and then caught pneumonia, or you have exacerbated chronic bronchitis. It usually takes no more than 5 days to go on a hike, so it is better to continue treatment with antibiotics upon returning home under the supervision of specialists.

Despite the above, it is still worth putting an antibiotic in your first aid kit. Our recommendation is Sumamed (azithromycin), it has a wide range of uses and is applied once a day and comes in tablets. It is also noteworthy that the course of treatment is only 3 days, which is ideal for hiking.

Further - Tsifran (in tablets) is a drug with a very large spectrum of action, suitable for the treatment of lung diseases and various infections. Flemoxin Solutab (Amoxicillin) is an antibiotic from the penicillin group, a very effective drug, suitable for the treatment of many diseases - tonsillitis, otitis media, various other infections.

Analgesics

Perhaps, analgesics can be attributed to one of the most essential groups of medicines in a first aid kit. These are drugs that have an analgesic effect, and the risk of experiencing pain during a hike is very high. We recommend that you complete your first aid kit with the most proven means:

Analgin. This is one of the cheapest pain relievers available. Blocks pain only of low and medium intensity, can be useful for relieving mild headaches or toothaches, but not suitable for severe cases. Another disadvantage is that there are many contraindications and side effects. aralgin. Quite quickly relieves even very severe pain, much more effective than analgin, but it is also more expensive. There are also various contraindications.

Tramal (tramadol). A very powerful pain reliever. The instructions say that it is not a narcotic substance, although over time its effect begins to weaken and the time of pain relief decreases. In pharmacies, sales are made by prescription, but if you “ask well,” explaining that you are going on a long hike and all that, it is possible that you will be released without a prescription. It has a very long-lasting effect of pain relief - up to 5 hours, but there are also side effects. etanov. Quite a strong pain reliever, helps with toothaches, to relieve pain from bruises and cuts. The dosage of this drug should be observed and should not be used for more than 2 days. ovocaine. Local anesthetic. Good product, inexpensive and very well tolerated. Perfect for anesthesia if you need to stitch a wound or pull out a bad tooth.

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